Writing About Writing: What Sprinters Can Learn From Plodders

Wow. Three weeks have passed since my last post. Where did the time go?

It has been too easy to push my book writing project to one side. After the initial buzz I got from sharing my outline wore off, I turned my attention elsewhere. I thought, I’ve got lots of time, and lots of other things calling out for my attention. There is urgent client work to complete, special projects to push forward on (Paris and I are creating an online course in how to build your aut... keep reading


Writing About Writing: Follow My Progress As I Write My Book

Last week I announced to the world that I am writing a book about writing a book, and promised to share my progress with anyone who cares to follow along. This post is my very first progress report! (Cue the tiny marching band! I believe in celebrating early and often.)

I’m doing this for two reasons. First, I want to share my experience as a first time author in the hope that it will encourage others to dive into their own... keep reading


Writing About Writing: Announcing My Forthcoming Book

I have an announcement to make.

I am writing a book. I’m writing a book about writing a book. (To which Paris, our marketing and communications coordinator, said: “That’s so meta…”)

This should be a cinch for me. I have been an editor for nearly twenty years, over which time I have worked with hundreds of writers. Most of them were professional journalists or feature writers, but in recent years in my role as publisher at LifeTree Media, I have worked almost exclusively with first-time authors.

Every day I  support people in writing... keep reading


How to turn fear into fuel for your writing

Writing is scary. It means exposure – putting ourselves out there to be judged, criticized, mocked, ignored, enjoyed, learned from and admired. And it’s not only what we have to say that makes us anxious; we also worry about how we say it. We are afraid that our ideas aren’t original enough. That someone else has already done it better. That our style is bland. That our jokes are lame. Really, there is so much to fear about writing, it’s practically a miracle that anyone has ever managed to publish anything.

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Dr. Shefali Tsabary Applauds Generation Stressed

We are so excited to announce the support of Dr. Shefali Tsabary for Michele Kambolis’ forthcoming book Generation Stressed: Play-Based Tools to Help Your Child Overcome Anxiety.

Dr. Shefali is a clinical psychologist specializing in family dynamics and personal development. She is also a keynote speaker, the founder of Global Inner Disarmament and a multi-award winning author. Her books, The Conscious Parent – Transformation Ourselves, Empowering Our Children and Out of Control – Why Disciplining Yo... keep reading


Focus on excellence and the success will follow

In a recent Fast Company article, Deepak Chopra stated that “wealth is nothing other than abundance consciousness.” In our lives, we are constantly bombarded with different ideas about what “success” is. Admittedly, the definition of success is different from person to person, but for many of us, this term is associated directly with financial gain. This means that we climb hard and we climb fast from the moment we step on to the botto... keep reading


Big dreams begin with baby steps

When your dreams are huge (as the best dreams are), it can be hard to clearly see the path you need to follow to reach them.

They might seem far away and out of reach, like a mountain peak from which you are separated by a deep and twisting valley. You know exactly where you are going and you know you need to navigate through the valley in order to get there.

It’s easy to feel on top of our plans when the sky is clear and we are enjoying a birds ... keep reading


Mastering moment to moment mindfulness

The great thing about doing yoga at home is that it’s always available. If you can get away from dogs and kids and clear a strip on the floor, you can do yoga, even in your underwear.

But the downside to doing solo yoga, of course, is the absence of a teacher to lead you through the poses and – critically – to remind you to breathe.

I was doing yoga at home the other day when I realized that when I’m practicing alone, I have a tendency to cut myself short every time I transition from one pose to another. And I realized that tendency carries over into my... keep reading